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3 Steps to Satellite Network Success The reason why network architects might not consider satellite as prime connectivity option might very well be because they have not had a good experience, or alternatively, might not be fully informed about the technology. Because satellite is a niche solution, it is also seldom included in mainstream discussions and even very influential industry events might not have satellite as part of the workshop topics to be discussed. Here are some guidelines around designing effective satellite network solutions and unlocking the business benefits of using

Satellite - Ideal for African Connectivity.

Satellite Internet quicker. As fibre Internet service becomes available in more places across Africa, fast broadband Internet is becoming a reality for many citizens. However, people who live in hard to reach or isolated places will never be able to experience these speeds. Or will they? Dr Dawie de Wet, CEO of Q-KON, a satellite Internet provider, says there is good news for rural and isolated communities. “Satellite Internet is quicker and more readily available than ever before.” “He says satellite Internet works in this type of location because it beams data to an orbiting

Satellite helps bridge digital divide in Africa. There are many remote regions in Africa where it is easy to feel isolated from the rest of the world. Broadband is scarce and Internet connections are not only rare, but notoriously unreliable. Africa is vast and very rural in many parts. The continent is not only massive in terms of land mass, but in the potential that it represents to businesses across all industries. Corporations from all over the globe are eyeing Africa as the next place where business is set to boom. However, making this potential a reality will require overcoming so

Africa turns to satellite Internet. In Africa, technologies of all types are evolving rapidly, with one exception - Internet access. With around only 170 million users, Internet penetration remains low, at around 18%, well below the global average. Low Internet penetration in Africa is without a doubt an obstacle to the continent’s development. Moreover, this is only getting worse as time goes on, so the gap is only getting wider and wider. Lack of access to the Internet is depriving many Africans of the opportunity to harness the advantages of technologies such as e-learning as well

The why and how of HTS. On August 24 this year, Intelsat announced that Intelsat 33e, the second of seven planned Intelsat Epic high throughput satellites, was launched successfully from French Guiana aboard an Ariane 5 launch vehicle. Intelsat 33e, manufactured by Boeing, will bring high throughput capacity in both C- and Ku-band to the Africa, Europe, Middle East and Asia regions. According to Africa Bandwidth Maps, Africa’s terrestrial network reached 732,662km in 2012. The fibre reach map clearly shows that most of Africa’s main urban hubs are now connected by fibre transmission

Satellite brings broadband to game reserve. In the more remote parts of the country, there is very little infrastructure, making it harder to provide ubiquitous broadband. Visitors to locations that are off the beaten track find that reliable Internet connections are not readily available. This can be a major inconvenience to tourists who are used to being connected 24/7, and can be a stumbling block to economic growth in these areas. Dr Dawie de Wet, CEO of Q-KON, a satellite Internet provider, explains that many of South Africa’s game lodges are located in isolated areas, where roug

Why satellite is ideal for African connectivity. Africa is known for its rugged beauty and diverse natural environments. The continent has also seen some of the highest economic growth in the world over the past few years. This has been despite a lack of existing infrastructure and is largely due to the low base Africa has been growing from, explains Dr Dawie de Wet, CEO of Q-KON, a specialist provider of satellite connectivity solutions. “Africa has enjoyed a steady growth rate upwards of 3% since 2008, with many international organisations investing in the continent. As a result of

What the loss of Falcon 9 and Amos 6 mean for African connectivity On September 1, 2016, international space exploration company SpaceX suffered a failure during the static test fire of the Falcon 9 rocket. Designed to transport satellites, Falcon 9 was scheduled to haul the AMOS-6 satellite into geostationary orbit. The rocket suffered an unspecified failure in the second stage's LOX tank during the test, and both rocket and satellite were destroyed. It takes pioneers and brave entrepreneurs to open new markets, to push new limits and reach new frontiers. These individuals are responsi

WhichVoIP launches VOIP phone comparison, with headline sponsor Q-KON SA and AudioCodes. Increased competition in a rapidly evolving industry, together with the availability of information on the public Internet, has influenced how consumers engage and interact with telecoms technology and the vendor community. By leveraging the Internet, customers are now able to become self-educated and make an informed decision on which product, and through which channel, they are able to acquire their chosen VOIP technology. Mitchell Barker, Founder and CEO of WhichVoIP in South Africa, the leading

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